Aug 10, 2020  
Catalog 2018-19 
    
Catalog 2018-19 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This inventory contains both credit and Continuing Education courses. Credit courses have a 4-letter course prefix, while Continuing Education courses have a 3-letter course prefix.

 

Physical Education - Life Fitness

  
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    PELF 139 - Spin Cycle


    1 Credit(s).

    Engages the student in applying the principles of exercise and the practice or cardio fitness through consistent training on indoor exercise cycles. Students learn to monitor their heart rate and intensity level in order to progress at a pace appropriate to their current fitness level and age. NOTE: Course offered every fall, spring and may be offered during additional sessions.

  
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    PELF 143 - Hatha Yoga


    2 Credit(s).

    Introduces students to the practice of hatha yoga, which is the yoga of movement. Class emphasis will be on learning yoga asanas (postures) and pranayama (breathing exercises) to enhance well-being of body, mind, and spirit. This course incorporates expanded instructional time and provides opportunity for students to engage deeply in the practice of yoga. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

  
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    PELF 144 - Meditation for Wellness


    1 Credit(s).

    Introduces students to a variety of formal and informal meditation practices that have a documented positive impact on wellness. Students learn about the benefits of mediation and how it can reduce symptoms of stress and illness, while improving attention and well-being. NOTE: Course offered every fall, spring and may be offered during additional sessions.

  
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    PELF 145 - Dance Aerobics I


    2 Credit(s).

    Designed primarily as an exercise course for students who would like to engage in a vigorous activity that produces specific beneficial changes in the body’s fitness level. Aerobic dance is an exciting and challenging fitness activity that combines exercise (exertion) and dance steps (rhythmic movements). Emphasis will be placed on exercises, jogging, and dancing movements with varying tempos and rhythms. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

  
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    PELF 150 - Mixed Martial Arts Fitness


    2 Credit(s).

    Uses resistance training and various physical fitness routines from a variety of martial arts in order to improve cardiovascular endurance , muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and body composition. Lectures and activities are used to further develop students’ skills for assessing and improving their level of wellness throughout their life span. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.


Physical Education - Majors

  
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    PEMJ 100 - Swimming Level I


    1 Credit(s).

    Provides a basic introduction to elementary swimming skills for physical education majors who are non-swimmers and/or those who cannot swim 25 yards; also introduces various teaching methodologies. Courses offered less than once a year.

  
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    PEMJ 101 - Orientation to Physical Education, Recreation and Health


    3 Credit(s).

    Introduces physical education as a profession emphasizing its nature, relationship to general education, and opportunities for employment; enables freshman physical education majors to enhance their understanding of the profession and their career choices. Courses offered once a year (fall or spring).

  
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    PEMJ 102 - Swimming Level II


    1 Credit(s).

    Provides practice for physical education majors who can swim 100 yards in good form using all strokes. Covers intermediate and advanced aquatic skills, competitive swim strokes, water safety, cardiovascular fitness concepts, and various teaching methodologies. Courses offered less than once a year.

  
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    PEMJ 111 - Folk and Social Dance: Methods and Materials


    3 Credit(s).

    Introduces dance forms of different cultures with emphasis on rhythmic analysis; provides opportunity to learn folk and social dances, including ballroom. Three hours a week. Note: Credit may be earned for DANC 111 or PEMJ 111, but not for both. NOTE: Course offered less than once a year.

    Corequisite(s): ESOL 054  or ACLT 053 
  
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    PEMJ 114 - Soccer


    1 Credit(s).

    Enables physical education majors to develop individual skills, offensive and defensive strategies and team concepts; provides coverage of basic principles of teaching soccer. Courses offered less than once a year.

  
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    PEMJ 115 - Basketball


    1 Credit(s).

    Provides physical education majors with an emphasis on teaching methodology. In addition, the mastering of individual fundamentals of basketball skills, basic team offenses, basic team defenses, and game rules are emphasized. Courses offered less than once a year.

  
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    PEMJ 132 - Golf - Physical Education Major


    1 Credit(s).

    Introduces fundamental principles of the basic golf swing; emphasizes development of swing technique concepts, followed by practice in developing a coordinated swing. Develops the ability to analyze a swing and correct errors. A fee is charged. Courses offered once a year (fall or spring).

  
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    PEMJ 136 - Fitness Evaluation and Conditioning


    3 Credit(s).

    Examines the principles and concepts of physical fitness; includes pre and post fitness assessments, exercise prescriptions, lectures, and practical applications. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Same As: HLTH 136  and PELF 136 . Credit can be earned for one course only.
    Corequisite(s): ESOL 054  or ACLT 053 
    Lab Fee: $30.00
  
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    PEMJ 140 - Beginning Tennis


    1 Credit(s).

    For physical education majors, this course includes the fundamental principles of the basic strokes as well as the rules, terminology, etiquette and strategy of singles and doubles play. The principles of teaching tennis are a significant part of the class. Courses offered less than once a year.

  
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    PEMJ 195 - Special Topics


    5 Credit(s).

  
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    PEMJ 231 - Prevention, Evaluation and Care of Athletic Injuries


    3 Credit(s).

    Introduces the student to the theoretical instruction with practical application; examines preventive conditioning, care and evaluation of athletic injuries, basic knowledge of drugs and ergogenic aids in athletics, the law of sports injuries and protective taping and padding. NOTE: Course offered less than once a year.

    Same As: AEXS 231  and HLTH 231 . Credit can be earned for one course only.
    Prerequisite(s): ESOL 054  and ESOL 052  or   or ACLT 053 
  
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    PEMJ 271 - Internship: PEMJ


    1 Credit(s).

  
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    PEMJ 272 - Internship: PEMJ


    2 Credit(s).

  
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    PEMJ 273 - Internship: PEMJ


    3 Credit(s).

  
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    PEMJ 283 - Cooperation Education II


    3 Credit(s).

  
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    PEMJ 291 - Independent Study


    1 Credit(s).


Physical Education - Outdoor Activities

  
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    PEOD 100 - Backpacking


    1 Credit(s).

    Applies basic techniques of backpacking and camping; includes day hikes and an overnight weekend camping trip into a wilderness area. Students provide sleeping bags and food.

  
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    PEOD 101 - Hiking and Backpacking


    2 Credit(s).

    Introduces the knowledge and skills of trail hiking and backpacking techniques. Activities include a classroom session and a three day novice trip into a wilderness area. Courses offered less than once a year.

    Lab Fee: $25.00
  
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    PEOD 103 - Camping


    1 Credit(s).

    Introduces all aspects of family camping; meets for 8 hours in the classroom; includes a 3-day weekend camping trip with the class; camping gear provided. Courses offered less than once a year.

    Lab Fee: $25.00

Physical Education - Team Activities

  
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    PETA 101 - Basketball


    1 Credit(s).

    Emphasizes the basic skills including dribbling, passing shooting, and defensive marking. Team offenses and defenses will be included. Activity sessions will include drills and game play. Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

  
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    PETA 104 - Baseball/Conditioning


    1 Credit(s).

    Courses offered once a year (fall or spring).

  
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    PETA 110 - Field Games and Basketball


    2 Credit(s).

    Deals with progressive techniques and selected field games in the first seven weeks; provides an in-depth study of basketball in the second seven weeks. This course may be used to fulfill 2 elective credits. Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

  
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    PETA 111 - Soccer


    1 Credit(s).

    Emphasizes the basic skills, including dribbling, passing, shooting, and defensive marking. Basic offensive and defensive systems will be covered during drills and game play. Courses offered less than once a year.

  
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    PETA 121 - Box Soccer/Conditioning


    1 Credit(s).

    Introduces the basic skills and strategies of indoor box soccer, with emphasis on cardiovascular improvement and conditioning. Courses offered less than once a year.

  
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    PETA 131 - Softball


    1 Credit(s).

    Courses offered less than once a year.


Physician Assistant

  
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    PAST 212 - Public Health and Preventive Medicine


    2 Credit(s).

    Presents the dynamics of health and disease in human populations and introduces services and facilities for the maintenance of health and prevention of illness. Explores concepts of demography, epidemiology, environmental health, provision of medical services, preventive medicine and infectious disease; addresses basic principles of health policy making. NOTE: Courses offered once a year (fall or spring).

  
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    PAST 214 - Psychosocial Issues in Medicine I


    2 Credit(s).

    Covers psychological processes underlying human behavior in medical settings. Emphasizes the dynamics of the patient-health provider relationship, including communication skills, approaches to patients, working with special populations, cross-cultural communication, stress and disease, chronic illness, adherence, domestic violence, human sexuality issues, and death and dying. NOTE: Course offered once a year (summer).

  
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    PAST 216 - Psychosocial Issues in Medicine II


    2 Credit(s).

    Covers psychological process underlying human behavior and psychiatric disorders. Emphasizes psychiatric principles in primary care; examines concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of the major classes of psychiatric disorders; psychiatric emergencies in primary care; special issues in geriatric mental health; and prevention, recognition and intervention of child abuse and sexual assault. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

  
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    PAST 224 - Gross Anatomy


    2 Credit(s).

    Introduces and presents the inter-relationship of anatomical structures and the influence of one on the other in health and disease; includes an off-site cadaver laboratory; prepares the entering Physician Assistant student for future courses in medicine. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Lab Fee: $40.00
  
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    PAST 225 - Human Pathophysiology


    2 Credit(s).

    Provides the basic structural, functional, and pathological foundations needed for the understanding of disease processes in humans; covers the reaction of the human body to disease from the cellular to multi-system level; prepares the entering Physician Assistant for future courses in medicine and prevention. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Prerequisite(s): PAST 224  
    Lab Fee: $40.00
  
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    PAST 226 - Ethics, Trends and Professional Issues


    3 Credit(s).

    Explores the history, current state and future of the PA Profession. Introduces the student to principles of medical ethics which are then applied controversial topics in healthcare to enable the student to solve ethical dilemmas. Explores common legal and political issues affecting healthcare providers. Explores the importance of cultural diversity as applicable to provision of healthcare. Applies principles learned in medical decision-making scenarios. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

  
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    PAST 230 - Diagnostic Studies I


    2 Credit(s).

    Provides proficiency in performing, ordering and interpreting diagnostic studies. Covers ordering and interpretation of radiographs, imaging studies, and electrocardiograms; gives students opportunity to perform 12 lead EKG studies. The first of three courses. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Lab Fee: $100.00
  
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    PAST 231 - Diagnostic Studies II


    2 Credit(s).

    Prepares students to perform and interpret basic diagnostic and laboratory tests; emphasizes those tests necessary to assess complaints common to the ambulatory, hospitalized, and emergency medicine patient. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Lab Fee: $100.00
  
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    PAST 232 - Diagnostic Studies III


    2 Credit(s).

    Prepares students to perform and interpret basic diagnostic and laboratory tests; emphasizes those tests necessary to assess complaints common to the ambulatory, hospitalized, and emergency medicine patient. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Lab Fee: $300.00
  
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    PAST 236 - Basic Physical Diagnosis


    2 Credit(s).

    Introduces the diagnostic process focusing on the proper methods of obtaining, performing, recording and presenting patient history and physical examinations; emphasizes interpersonal communication skills; presents a system approach to performing the physical examination and an overview of common symptoms. Requires students to act as surrogates for other students. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

  
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    PAST 237 - Advanced Physical Diagnosis


    2 Credit(s).

    Advances the diagnostic process focusing on specific systems’ examination techniques, special maneuvers for pathology and special populations, including obtaining, recording and presenting patient histories and physical examinations; advancing interpersonal communication skills; presenting a system-by-system approach to performing the physical examination and neurological examination with problem-focused symptomatology; and, verbal and written presentations of complete and focused examinations. Students are expected to serve as surrogates for other students. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Prerequisite(s): PAST 224 , PAST 225 , PAST 236 
  
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    PAST 250 - Introduction to Clinical Practice


    4 Credit(s).

    Develops basic clinical skills presented in PAST 213 , focusing on the diagnostic process and elements of clinical management. Assigns students to the clinical setting for one or two 8-hour days per week and small groups with faculty members for 2 hours each week. Emphasizes eliciting the patient history, physical assessment, recording patient data and case presentation, diagnosis and basic management plans, and performing basic clinical skills with actual patients in the clinical setting. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

  
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    PAST 251 - Clinical Practicum I


    6 Credit(s).

    Gives the first of four clinical practical which provide a total of ten clinical rotations in family practice, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, surgery, emergency medicine, community medicine, psychiatry, and two general elective areas in primary care and general medicine. During this 10-week course, each student is assigned to two 5-week rotations. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Lab Fee: $350.00
  
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    PAST 252 - Clinical Practicum II


    6 Credit(s).

    Provides the physician assistant student with patient care experience under the supervision of a licensed/certified healthcare practitioner. Students apply knowledge and skills learned in the didactic year to patient evaluation, and begin to apply patient management strategies to patients during five-week rotations in theses specialties: family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, emergency medicine, surgery, and community medicine. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Prerequisite(s): PAST 250  and PAST 251  
    Lab Fee: $350.00
  
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    PAST 253 - Clinical Practicum III


    3 Credit(s).

    Continues the sequence of four courses which provide supervised clinical experiences in internal medicine, family practice, pediatrics, obstetrics/gynecology, emergency medicine, surgery, psychiatry, community medicine, and an additional rotation of the student’s choice. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Lab Fee: $350.00
  
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    PAST 254 - Clinical Practicum IV


    11 Credit(s).

    Concludes the sequence of four clinical courses which provide supervised clinical experiences in internal medicine, family practice, pediatrics, obstetrics/gynecology, emergency medicine, surgery, psychiatry, community medicine, and an additional rotation of the student’s choice. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Lab Fee: $350.00
  
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    PAST 255 - Clinical Practicum V


    5 Credit(s).

    The Primary Care Preceptorship, the final clinical experience, provides the student with an opportunity to apply principles of the practice of medicine covered throughout the program in a primary care or rural/underserved location. The student will function as a full member of the medical team and be responsible for patient care from presentation through follow-up including diagnostic evaluation and patient management.

    Lab Fee: $350.00

Physics

  
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    PHYS 101 - Fundamentals of Physics I


    4 Credit(s).

    Explores the basic principles of physics including Newtonian kinematics, dynamics, statics, momentum, energy, and heat energy.  This course is appropriate for students expecting to apply to one of the health care professional schools (e.g. medical, physical therapy, pharmacy, dental, etc.) and also for students in certain technical programs which require physics (e.g. electronics, computer service, architectural drafting, etc.).  Students intending to major in engineering are required to take the       sequence. 
      3 lecture hours and 3 laboratory hours per week. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 135  (Grade of B or higher) or   (Grade of C or higher) or   (Grade of C or higher) or any 200-level MATH course and    and ESOL 054  or   or ACLT 053 
    Lab Fee: $40.00
  
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    PHYS 102 - Fundamentals of Physics II


    4 Credit(s).

    Continues the basic principles of physics for students who are not expecting to major in engineering or the physical sciences. Covers the phenomena, concepts, and theories of classical and modern physics; includes electricity and magnetism, optics, and selected topics from modern physics. 3 lecture hours and 3 laboratory hours per week. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 101  with a grade of “C” or better
    Lab Fee: $40.00
  
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    PHYS 105 - How Things Work


    3 Credit(s).

    Uses a conceptual approach to present selected physics topics. Topics will include the scientific method, motion, matter, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, and optics. For students needing a lab, PHYS 111  serves as the accompanying lab. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): ESOL 052  and ESOL 054  or   or ACLT 053 ; and MATH 082 

     

  
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    PHYS 111 - Physical Science Lab


    1 Credit(s).

    Introduces students to the application of the scientific process in order to connect how experimentation leads to the derivation of physics concepts. Topics include motion, matter, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, and optics. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in or successful completion with a “C” or better of PHYS 105  
    Lab Fee: $40.00
  
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    PHYS 151 - General Physics I


    4 Credit(s).

    Covers Newtonian mechanics, kinematics and dynamics of translational, rotational, and simple harmonic motions; momentum, energy and gravitation.  It serves as first course in a set of three calculus-based courses in the basic principles of physics for students who plan to major in engineering, mathematics or physical sciences.   The course demands a mathematical knowledge of algebra, trigonometry and calculus.
      NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 251  with a “C” or higher. PHYS 101  or Physical Science Coordinator’s permission and   and   or   or ACLT 053  
    Lab Fee: $40.00
  
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    PHYS 251 - General Physics II


    4 Credit(s).

    Includes electricity and magnetism, kinetic theory, thermodynamics, thermal energy and heat transfer; builds on PHYS 151  toward a three-semester set of calculus-based courses in the basic principles of physics for students who plan to major in engineering, mathematics or physical sciences. 3 lecture hours, 1 recitation hour and 3 laboratory hours per week. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 151  with a “C” or higher
    Lab Fee: $40.00
  
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    PHYS 252 - General Physics III


    4 Credit(s).

    Covers wave motion, transverse and longitudinal elastic waves, electromagnetic waves, physical optics and selected topics in modern physics; builds on PHYS 151  toward a three-semester set of calculus-based courses in the basic principles of physics for students who plan to major in engineering, mathematics or physical sciences. 3 lecture hours, 3 laboratory hours and 1 recitation hours per week. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Prerequisite(s): PHYS 151  with a “C” or higher
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in or successful completion with a “C” or better of PHYS 251  
    Lab Fee: $40.00

Political Science

  
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    POLS 101 - American Government and Politics


    3 Credit(s).

    Introduces students to the historical foundation of the American political system and United States Constitution and their impact upon citizens.  Students examine the workings, processes and organizations inside and outside government, interest groups, political parties and media, along with the making of public policy and foreign policy. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): ESOL 052  and ESOL 054  or ACLT 052  or ACLT 053  
  
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    POLS 105 - State and Local Government and Politics


    3 Credit(s).

    Introduces students to the systematic study of government, politics and the legislative process.  Students analyze the foundation, development, and exercise of executive power at the state and local levels of government. Students examine the structure of state courts and their role in government, and study how state and local government affects their lives, jobs and community. This course gives special attention to Maryland and Baltimore County Governments. NOTE: Course offered once a year (fall or spring)

    Corequisite(s):  ESOL 054  and ESOL 052  or ACLT 053 
  
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    POLS 107 - Introduction to the US Congress


    3 Credit(s).

    Introduces students a comprehensive introduction to Congress through an investigation of the legislative branch of government as envisioned by the framers of the Constitution and analyzes its growth into the institution it has become. Students review the Articles of Confederation then examine Article One of the Constitution and the powers of Congress. Students will discuss the personalities, the legislative process, partisan battles, elections, congressional procedures and pressures along with the demands from voters and lobbyists.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 101 
  
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    POLS 111 - Introduction to Political Science


    3 Credit(s).

    Examines the concepts and methodology of Political Science as well as the various fields of the discipline including American politics, comparative politics, international politics and political philosophy and the origins of our political values. Students analyze political ideas, theories, ideologies, systems and polices in order to focus on and investigate political problems on a national and global level as well as define central concepts related to the study of political science. Examine the workings, processes and organizations inside and outside government, interest groups, political parties and media along with the making of public and foreign policy. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): ESOL 052  and ESOL 054  or ACLT 052  or ACLT 053  
  
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    POLS 121 - Introduction to Law


    3 Credit(s).

    Describes the institutions and profession of law in America, for students considering further study or a career in law. Examines the legal system in terms of its role in society, its organization, the training and profession of its members, and the basic substance and procedures of civil and criminal law. Courses offered less than once a year.

    Prerequisite(s): ESOL 054  and   or    or ACLT 053 ; and MATH 081 
  
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    POLS 123 - You and Everyday Law


    3 Credit(s).

    Courses offered less than once a year.

  
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    POLS 131 - Comparative Government and Politics


    3 Credit(s).

    Introduces students in the systematic study of comparative government and politics as well as the primary concepts used by political scientists to study the development and outcomes of government and politics in variety of countries. By studying a variety of countries, students move beyond concepts to concrete examples and will address the following question: Why are some countries stable democracies and not others? Note: This course is a globally intensive course that promotes intercultural competency and global awareness. Successful completion of this course contributes toward the 15 credits of globally intensive curriculum needed to earn the certificate of Global Distinction. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): ESOL 052  and ESOL 054  or ACLT 052  or ACLT 053  
  
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    POLS 141 - International Relations


    3 Credit(s).

    Introduces students to the nation-state system as well as the conflict and cooperation in the international arena covering economic and military power, diplomacy, terrorism, international law and organizations. An emphasis will be placed on U.S foreign policy analyzing its international impact. Students explore how 20th Century international conflicts such as World War I, World War II, the Cold War and terrorism influenced 21st Century thinking. Students question and discover what selected political leaders have learned from international conflict. Note: This course is a globally intensive course that promotes intercultural competency and global awareness. Successful completion of this course contributes toward the 15 credits of globally intensive curriculum needed to earn the certificate of Global Distinction. NOTE: Course offered less than once a year.

    Corequisite(s): ESOL 054  and ESOL 052  or ACLT 053 
  
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    POLS 160 - Political Philosophy and Ideology


    3 Credit(s).

    Investigates the major ideologies and philosophies of the modern world such as nationalism, fascism, socialism, classical liberalism, conservatism, Marxism-Leninism, and neo-conservatism along with the newer ideologies of the extreme left and right. The character of American political ideologies will be analyzed and compared. Students integrate contemporary work in political philosophy and examine political thought and contributions from the Greeks and English and how philosophy relates to ideology. NOTE: Course offered less than once a year.

    Corequisite(s): ESOL 054  and ESOL 052  or ACLT 053  
  
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    POLS 200 - Campaigns and Elections


    3 Credit(s).

    Introduces students to the study of the electoral process in the United States with an examination of the history of national, state and local elections. The course explores several features and topics of political campaigns and elections in America; political socialization, voting behavior, public opinion, media, political parties, interest groups, the influence of money, and the aftermath of election in relation to policy decisions and outcomes. Students will analyze campaign strategies and experience working on a political campaign of their choice for 40 hours during the semester. Students will investigate the question; who wins elections- and why- in American politics?

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 101 , POLS 111  or permission of the Political Science Program Coordinator.
  
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    POLS 204 - Comparative Crime and Criminal Justice


    3 Credit(s).

    Compares the structure and operation of the government, police, courts and corrections of various countries. In addition, the course examines international substantive criminal law and criminal procedural law, response to crime and international government and police cooperation. Note: This course is a globally intensive course that promotes intercultural competency and global awareness. Successful completion of this course contributes toward the 15 credits of globally intensive curriculum needed to earn the certificate of Global Distinction. NOTE: Course offered less than once a year.

    Same As: CRJU 204 
    Prerequisite(s):  ESOL 054  and ESOL 052  or   or ACLT 053 ; and CRJU 101  or written consent of instructor.
  
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    POLS 225 - Constitutional Law


    3 Credit(s).

    Examines the nature and development of the United States Constitution interpreted by the Supreme Court. Students analyze the role judicial review, federalism, Congressional and Presidential authority play in the system. Students examine the relationship between government accountability, the languages in the constitution, and the role of the Supreme Court. Students review civil liberties and rights along with the limits on the government granted by the First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Fourteenth Amendments. Courses offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 101 , POLS 111  or written permission from the Political Science Program Coordinator.
  
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    POLS 247 - Contemporary Middle East Politics


    3 Credit(s).

    Examines 21st century Middle East politics and policy and their relationship to the United States. Students explore complex current issues in a political and historical context for understanding the Middle East. Topics include U.S foreign policy in the region, the role of Islam, terrorism, the politics of oil, arms proliferation, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Palestinian Question, nationalism, globalization and the Gulf Wars. Students investigate the social, religious, economic, and political impact Middle East nations have on the U.S and with each other. Note: This course is a globally intensive course that promotes intercultural competency and global awareness. Successful completion of this course contributes toward the 15 credits of globally intensive curriculum needed to earn the certificate of Global Distinction. NOTE: Course offered less than once a year.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 101 , POLS 111  or permission from the Political Science Program Coordinator.
  
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    POLS 271 - Internship: Political Science


    1 Credit(s).

    Provides academic credit for knowledge and skills learned on the job in the areas of politics and government. The student is familiarized with the practical workings of government institutions. This course requires a 30 work hour commitment from the student. Students work with the Internship Coordinator, who monitors student’s progress, to develop learning objectives. To apply for an internship, contact the Political Science Coordinator for additional information. Student applicants are selected by the department and intern in the offices of elected officials or organizations that work with governmental organizations.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 101  and POLS 111 , a minimum GPA of 2.5, and consent of the Program Coordinator.
  
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    POLS 272 - Internship: Political Science


    2 Credit(s).

    Provides academic credit for knowledge and skills learned on the job in the areas of politics and government. The student is familiarized with the practical workings of government institutions. This course requires a 60 work hour commitment from the student. Students work with the Internship Coordinator, who monitors student’s progress, to develop learning objectives. To apply for an internship, contact the Political Science Coordinator for additional information. Student applicants are selected by the department and intern in the offices of elected officials or organizations that work with governmental organizations.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 101  and POLS 111 , a minimum GPA of 2.5, and consent of the Program Coordinator.
  
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    POLS 273 - Internship: Political Science


    3 Credit(s).

    Provides academic credit for knowledge and skills learned on the job in the areas of politics and government. The student is familiarized with the practical workings of government institutions. This course requires a 90 work hour commitment from the student. Students work with the Internship Coordinator, who monitors student’s progress, to develop learning objectives. To apply for an internship, contact the Political Science Coordinator for additional information. Student applicants are selected by the department and intern in the offices of elected officials or organizations that work with governmental organizations.

    Prerequisite(s): POLS 101  and POLS 111 , a minimum GPA of 2.5, and consent of the Program Coordinator.
  
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    POLS 290 - Problems in Politics


    3 Credit(s).

    Offers topics on particular issues and problems in politics and government selected by students and the instructor. Topics vary from year to year. Courses offered less than once a year.


Project Management

  
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    PRMT 101 - Principles of Project Management


    3 Credit(s).

    Covers the foundation of managing projects in today’s business environment. Topics covered include the basic concepts of the five essential project management processes, defining requirements, schedules, risk management, and change control. Students gain a mastery of how the project management processes are used during the phases of a project to build a better, more effective project plan. Through the use of short case studies, practical exercises, class discussions, and lectures, participants have the opportunity to apply these best practices in a non-threatening classroom environment. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s):  ESOL 054  or   or ACLT 053  
  
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    PRMT 102 - Principles of Project Mgt II


    3 Credit(s).

    Provides an advanced look at managing projects in today’s business environment. Topics covered include techniques for identifying what constitutes an individual portfolio, establishing priorities, sharing resources across multiple projects, managing the day to day responsibilities of projects, and using sound subcontract management principles and practices. Students gain an in-depth understanding of how the project management processes are used during the various phases of a project and how to apply best practices to build better, more effective project plans.

    Prerequisite(s):  ESOL 054  or   or ACLT 053  
  
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    PRMT 103 - Contemporary Topics in Project Management


    3 Credit(s).

    Addresses the subject of project management using a life cycle approach. Topics discussed include: project selection methods and systems using decision support software; formation and organization of the project team; the various organizational approaches used to structure and house projects; the project planning process; the creation of a baseline plan and budget. Microsoft Project is used to apply this learning in simulation exercises.

    Prerequisite(s):  ESOL 054  or   or ACLT 053  

Psychology

  
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    PSYC 101 - Introduction to Psychology


    3 Credit(s).

    Surveys the science of psychology; addresses research methods, biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, states of consciousness, learning, memory, motivation and emotion, language, lifespan development, intelligence, stress and health, social behavior, personality, and abnormal behavior and treatment; applications of psychology in a culturally diverse world. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): ESOL 054  and ESOL 052  or   or ACLT 053 
  
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    PSYC 103 - Principles of Human Growth and Development


    3 Credit(s).

    Focuses on the scientific study of the biological, psychological, and social changes which occur over the human lifespan from conception until death. Topics addressed in this course include the effects of heredity and culture on human behavior and mental processes during prenatal development, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 105 - Multicultural Psychology


    3 Credit(s).

    Applies psychological principles, theories, and research to a broad range of interpersonal relationships; explores self-understanding, personality, friendship, family, group dynamics, and work relationships; employs cross-cultural research and diverse different cultural perspectives. Note: This course is a globally intensive course that promotes intercultural competency and global awareness. Successful completion of this course contributes toward the 15 credits of globally intensive curriculum needed to earn the certificate of Global Distinction. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): ESOL 054  and ESOL 052  or   or ACLT 053 
  
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    PSYC 106 - Personality and Adjustment for Mental Well-Being


    3 Credit(s).

    An introduction to the concepts of personality development and methods of adjustment. Topics include an overview of major personality theories, research strategies, the nature and effects of stress, effective and ineffective coping strategies, motivation, personality assessment, and psychotherapy. Cultural influences on personality and different cultural patterns of adjustment are discussed. Emphasis is placed on increasing self-understanding, an understanding of others, and developing mental well-being. Courses offered less than once a year.

  
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    PSYC 108 - Managing Behavior and Emotional Issues in Older Populations


    3 Credit(s).

    Presents the psychological principles, theories, and research pertaining to promoting behavior and emotional change; emphasizes developing and applying a variety of basic skills to elder care situations. Courses offered less than once a year.

    Prerequisite(s): ELDR 101 or written permission from coordinator required
  
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    PSYC 109 - Problems of the Elderly


    3 Credit(s).

    Presents psychological principles, theories, and research pertaining to the behavioral, emotional, cognitive, physical and medical problems faced by older individuals; covers dementia, memory and other cognitive issues, medication issues, stroke, circulation and heart issues, vision, hearing, and mobility issues, sexual issues, cancer, depression, death and dying issues, dual diagnosis and other behavior and emotional concerns faced by the elderly. Courses offered less than once a year.

    Prerequisite(s): ELDR 101 or written permission from coordinator required
  
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    PSYC 111 - Personal Psychology


    3 Credit(s).

    Examines the biological, psychological, cultural and social forces that influence the functioning of the individual student, including: childhood experiences, significant individuals both past and present, ethnicity, notions of masculinity and femininity, genetics, conformity and conditioning, and values as well as crisis or loss events across the lifespan. Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

  
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    PSYC 125 - Organizational Psychology


    3 Credit(s).

    Applies psychological principles and research to study the individual in organizational settings; covers history and research, motivational processes, leadership and management styles, physical environment, individual reactions (stress, alienation, burnout, job satisfaction), organizational entry change in work settings, job performance assessment, and organizational development; communication issues and technological and cultural influences. Courses offered less than once a year.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 150 - Sport Psychology


    3 Credit(s).

    Explores the many ways in which psychological factors play a significant role in both individual and group sports and physical activity. This course helps students understand how participation in sports, exercise and physical activity affects learning, motivation and emotions, and personality, as well as numerous social psychological concepts related to sports and exercise. NOTE: Course offered every fall, spring and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): ESOL 052  and ESOL 054  or ACLT 052  or ACLT 053  
  
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    PSYC 201 - Abnormal Psychology


    3 Credit(s).

    Examines the causes, diagnosis, assessment, symptoms, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders; includes historical and current theoretical perspectives, classification systems, cultural perspectives and legal/ethical issues. Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 202 - Altered States of Consciousness


    3 Credit(s).

    Examines the psychological research relating to sleep and dreaming, hypnosis, meditation, and imagination. Courses offered less than once a year.

    Prerequisite(s): ESOL 054  and ESOL 052  or   or ACLT 053  
  
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    PSYC 205 - Dynamics of Adjustment


    3 Credit(s).

    Explores the psychological, socio-cultural, and biological dynamics operative when people face situations that involve change and require adaptive behavior. The focus is on coping strategies utilized by people experiencing the stress of daily life, stress associated with various stages of development across the lifespan, and major stress reactions in response to crisis events. This course will also explore concepts and skills that teach how one can be helpful to friends, family, coworkers, clients, or patients in a variety of stressful circumstances. Courses offered less than once a year.

    Prerequisite(s): One previous psychology course or written permission from instructor required
  
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    PSYC 207 - Social Psychology


    3 Credit(s).

    Studies psychological principles and research pertaining to the social influences on behavior and mental processes; covers attitude formation and change, conformity, social exchange, prejudice, altruism, structure and function of groups, persuasion, motivation, aggression, and interpersonal attraction; examines culture’s impact on social behavior and human interactions. Courses offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 211 - Psychology of Early Childhood


    3 Credit(s).

    Explores development and behavior during the early childhood years, focusing on practical applications. NOTE: Course offered less than once a year.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 213 - Cognitive Psychology


    3 Credit(s).

    Introduces methods of investigation, theoretical perspectives, and research findings; examines memory, language, perception, information processing, and thought; emphasizes the interrelationship between theory and experimentation. Courses offered less than once a year.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 215 - Educational Psychology


    3 Credit(s).

    Applies psychological research and principles to educational theory and practice; covers human development, theories of learning and instruction, creating positive learning environments, teaching for learning, assessment and grading, learner differences, motivation, and the impact of culture and community. Designed primarily for pre- service teachers or others interested in the educational process. Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Same As: EDTR 215 . Credit can be earned for one course only.
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 217 - Theories of Personality


    3 Credit(s).

    Introduces major personality theories, their historical and social origins, and their contributions to psychotherapy; investigates Psychoanalysis, Neo-Freudian, Humanistic, Behavioral, Transactional Analysis, Gestalt, Radical Psychology, Cognitive, and other contemporary theories; explores the role of culture in personality development. Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 219 - Adolescent Psychology


    3 Credit(s).

    Focuses on the scientific study of the biological, psychological, cognitive, emotional, personality, and social changes that occur during adolescence; includes the effects of heredity and culture, major theories, moral development, gender-role issues, sexuality, and family relationship issues. Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 220 - Applied Learning Theory


    3 Credit(s).

    Explores psychological learning principles and research; focuses on procedures that modify and maintain behavioral change; includes methods of observing, analyzing, changing, and maintaining behavior. Course offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 221 - Human Sexuality


    3 Credit(s).

    Views human sexuality from biological, social, emotional, spiritual, cultural and historical viewpoints; covers topics such as gender formation, reproductive technology, STDs, sexual expression, and ways to build successful relationships will be presented. NOTE: Course offered fall, spring, and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Same As: HLTH 221 . Credit can be earned for one course only.
    Prerequisite(s): ESOL 054  and ESOL 052  or   or ACLT 053  
  
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    PSYC 222 - Child and Adolescent Psychopathology


    3 Credit(s).

    Provides an overview of common mental health diagnoses occurring in childhood and adolescence. This course includes a research-based perspective on the presentation, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of disorders, as well as resiliency factors. NOTE: Course offered every fall, spring and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Same As: HUSC 222 . Earn credit for one only.
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101  or HUSC 139 
  
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    PSYC 223 - Group Dynamics


    3 Credit(s).

    Presents interpersonal dynamics through direct participation in a small group experience; covers major theories and research strategies, interpersonal styles, forms of communication, group process, theories of interpersonal behavior, group goals, decision making, controversy and conflict, leadership, and communication problems. Courses offered once a year (fall or spring).

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 225 - Holistic Wellness


    3 Credit(s).

    Explores the interaction of mental and emotional states and physical wellness; emphasizes therapeutic techniques such as biofeedback, acupuncture, meditation, physical exercise, yoga, autogenic training, self-hypnosis, herbal medicine and coping skills; enables students to become proficient in at least one health maintenance or improvement technique. Courses offered less than once a year.

  
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    PSYC 226 - Perspectives on Death and Dying


    3 Credit(s).

    Explores behaviors, attitudes, emotions, and beliefs related to death, dying, and bereavement. In order to better understand ourselves and others, this course examines the cultural context of death, personal meaning of death at different stages in the life cycle, and the effect of death upon surviving family members and society. This course covers historical, psychological, sociological, cultural, physiological, religious, spiritual, ethical and legal viewpoints along the exploration of personal reactions to death, dying and bereavement.  NOTE: Course offered every fall, spring and may be offered during additional sessions.

    Same As: SOCL 226  
    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101  or SOCL 101  
  
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    PSYC 230 - Child Psychology


    3 Credit(s).

    Studies the physical, cognitive, linguistic, emotional, social, and personality development of the child from conception through adolescence; presents psychological principles, research and methodology; emphasizes scientific study of child development. Courses offered less than once a year.

    Prerequisite(s): PSYC 101 
  
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    PSYC 240 - The Helping Relationship


    3 Credit(s).

    Teaches effective communication, including listening and empathy skills, the verbal and nonverbal symbolic language, effective interpersonal relating, and crisis intervention. Topics include giving death notifications, understanding cultural diversity issues, assisting in conflict resolution and domestic violence situations, working with substance abusing or mentally ill persons, dealing with agitated individuals and distressed adults or children, and helping people (including one’s colleagues) who may be grieving, depressed, or suicidal. Emphasis is on the practical application of skill sets for helping professionals such as police officers, mental health counselors, nurses and various medical workers, funeral directors, clergy, social workers, teachers, and others. Courses offered once a year (fall or spring).

 

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